"We thought we were
going to work":
The forgotten story of the first 999 Jewish girls tricked into Auschwitz

Yom Hashoah:
Keeping Rena’s Promise
Alive in Our Hearts

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The first official Jewish transport to Auschwitz brought 999 young women. This is their story.

At the 75th anniversary of the liberation of the death camp, a survivor recalls how she came to Auschwitz in March 1942—and the terrible years that followed.

Horseshoe Crabs Mate in Annual Beach "Orgy"

Up and down the U.S. Eastern Seaboard, horseshoe crabs, which have been around for some 450 million years (200 million years before dinosaurs), are spawning. The crabs live in the ocean year-round but come ashore like clockwork every year between the May and June full moons to mate and lay eggs.

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The First Official,
All-Female Jewish Transport
to Auschwitz

On March 20, 1942, Slovakia ordered unmarried Jewish women ages 16 to 32 to register for government work. Many of them, even though they had never spent a night away from their homes, eagerly volunteered for what they thought would be three months of work at a shoe or munitions factory. Impeccably dressed and coiffed, dragging suitcases filled with handmade clothing and kosher food packed by their mothers, they boarded a passenger train.

Commentary:
A Survivor with Alzheimer’s

Commentator Heather Dune Macadam is the co-author of the book Rena’s Promise: A Story of Sisters in Auschwitz. It’s the autobiography of Holocaust survivor Rena Gellissen. Even though the book was published in 1995, Rena and Heather have remained close over the years. And since Rena was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, they have become even closer, in a way.

Commentary: 
The Weeping Buddha

A new mystery by Heather Dune Macadam, a police detective investigating a murder finds clues to an older case, the disappearance of a friend who vanished many years earlier. But the plot of the novel isn’t entirely fiction. It’s based on Heather Macadam’s own experience with a friend who disappeared almost 20 years ago. She’s found that basing a novel on people she knows could complicate her real life. (The Weeping Buddha is published by Akashic Books.)

Commentary:
An Adjunct Professor’s Life

Commentator Heather Dune Macadam is an adjunct professor, which means that she teaches part-time at three different institutions of higher learning but still has to get a summer job to make ends meet. She’s just applied for a job at Home Depot. Macadam is the author of the novel The Weeping Buddha, published by Akashic Books.

Commentary:
Pronoun Games

Commentator Heather Dune Macadam’s father became a woman 20 years ago. But only recently has Heather become used to calling her father “she.”

Commentary:
Joy of Vitamins

Commentator Heather Dune Macadam is an adjunct professor, which means that she teaches part-time at three different institutions of higher learning but still has to get a summer job to make ends meet. She’s just applied for a job at Home Depot. Macadam is the author of the novel The Weeping Buddha, published by Akashic Books.

Woman Typing

Commentary:
Plagiarism in College 

As an adjunct professor who teaches writing to undergraduates, commentator Heather Dune Macadam has plenty of experience with college freshmen — and their attempts to sneak by.

Heather Dune Macadam should be included in that rare category of literary mystery masters such as Lawrence Block, Craig Holden, and Giles Blunt, whose lyrical prose and beautifully developed characters have a great deal to say about the troubled world we live in and its legacy of violence.

Kaylie Jones, author of Celeste Ascending and A Soldier's Daughter Never Cries